Social Practices: A Wittgensteinian Approach to Human Activity and the Social

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Dimensions of practice theory 6. Practices and sociality Postscript: individual and totality Notes References Index. View via Publisher. Save to Library.

Spatial Practices.

Create Alert. Share This Paper. Citations Publications citing this paper. The emergence of practice; 2. Social practices; 5. Dimensions of practice theory; 6. Practices and sociality; Postscript: individual and totality; Notes; References; Index. Average Review. Write a Review. Related Searches. This companion book to the children's easy reader, A Horse, Of Course, is packed with This companion book to the children's easy reader, A Horse, Of Course, is packed with puzzles and activities of different levels for children from ages five to twelve.

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Because of this, scissor cutting are very important in developing fine motor skills. You will notice Little Gardener's Activity Book. As the title suggests, the book aims to show that Wittgenstein's philosophy and Kuhn's work are significant for social inquiry.

Social Practices - Theodore R Schatzki - Häftad () | Bokus

Even though the author is well aware of Wittgenstein's anti-theoretical stance and the non-empirical character of his philosophy, he maintains, on the one hand, that both Kuhn's and Wittgenstein's works are themselves exercises in social inquiry they are on the same side with the social sciences in contrast to the side of the natural sciences , bringing about important innovations, and, on the other, that they provide theoretical accounts of social practices such as linguistic and scientific practices, enriching our understanding of the conventional phenomena that constitute them.

How can Wittgenstein's philosophy be therapeutic and, in general, efficacious and yet leave everything as it is?

John Gunnell does not think that this remark implies a conservative or complacent attitude towards the way things are -- an interpretation often given of this particular statement -- nor does he think that the remark reflects the fact that Wittgenstein's philosophy does not have cognitive aspirations, another commonplace in Wittgensteinian literature. Gunnell's view turns on the distinction he draws between presentation and representation. Representation, as Gunnell understands it, requires that the object represented can be accessed independently of the representation whereas presentation constitutes its object through conceptualization.

According to him, social inquiry is engaged in representing already given meaningful social facts and, therefore, can only leave them alone in the effort to understand and interpret them.


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If it affects them, it may end up distorting them. This is an interesting reversal of the standard understanding of the relation between social and natural sciences and their respective subject matters. The most common idea is that the natural sciences confront an independently existing subject matter e. For instance, an anthropological investigation may affect the culture it takes as its object of study.

Gunnell thinks things are the other way around. Natural science makes presentational claims through conceptualization constituting its subject matter -- "there is no gap, we might say, between theory and fact" 59 -- whereas social science and philosophy, as practiced by Wittgenstein, confront already meaningful practices, which they leave alone if they are to be understood properly as what they are.

That is how Gunnell makes sense of Wittgenstein's idea that philosophy leaves everything as it is. He does not want to deny, however, that Wittgenstein's and Kuhn's philosophy can transform their respective disciplines, philosophy and philosophy of science. Given that, according to Gunnell, social inquiry including philosophy as practiced by Wittgenstein and philosophy of science as practiced by Kuhn is a second-order practice that studies other practices, Gunnell thinks that it is bound to reflect upon itself and its relation to its subject matter so that it represents it properly, thereby reforming or revolutionizing itself.

The above claims are central to the book. Gunnell sees Kuhn's work in the philosophy and history of science as an exemplification of the Wittgensteinian approach to philosophy, and views both as forms of social inquiry that can revolutionize the field without betraying the Wittgensteinian dictum of leaving everything as it is.

Their contribution consists in rejecting metaphysical projects and typical philosophical aspirations e.

Social Practices - A Wittgensteinian Approach to Human Activity and the Social (Paperback)

The book has seven chapters, a Preface and an Introduction. Two chapters 1 and 6 focus mostly on Kuhn, the others mostly on Wittgenstein. I say 'mostly' because Gunnell features a significant number of other philosophical positions from general philosophy of science and from contemporary philosophy in the course of presenting Kuhn's and Wittgenstein's work.

PHILOSOPHY - Michel Foucault

In Chapter 1 Gunnell's aim is to reject the charge of relativism leveled against Kuhn. Morris, who thought that Kuhn "had Wittgenstein and Hitler on his mind" when writing Structure , accused Kuhn of relativism, postmodernism and of denigrating truth. Gunnell's response is that these charges are motivated by the kind of philosophy that makes trans- or supra-scientific judgments about the criteria of truth. Kuhn, however, in Gunnell's view, influenced by Wittgenstein through Cavell, relays truth to "its rightful owners", the scientists, who have the theoretical criteria to judge rival claims.

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